0

Falling Down



Falling Down

Falling Down

  • Condition: New
  • Format: DVD
  • Widescreen; Closed-captioned; Color; Dolby; DVD; NTSC

A man who has lost his job and his marriage takes a walk through the troubled urban landscape of Los Angeles on a hot, destructive day, with a retiring police officer trying to anticipate the next stop.
Genre: Feature Film-Drama
Rating: R
Release Date: 8-FEB-2005
Media Type: DVD

List Price: $ 12.98

Price: [wpramaprice asin=”0790742780″]
elf on the shelf story

3 responses to “Falling Down”

  1. Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" says:
    114 of 131 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A film that really leaves its mark on you, May 23, 2003
    By 
    Daniel Jolley “darkgenius” (Shelby, North Carolina USA) –
    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)
      
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Falling Down (DVD)
    This is a powerful film, but I personally don’t look at it as some type of social commentary or condemnation of modern society, although it certainly touches on some of the problems that will always exist among human beings. Falling Down may well have a potent effect on anyone watching it, though. It always leaves me feeling really, really weird because it touches on so many things we all have to put up with each day, presents a monster whom I can’t help but sympathize with in some degree, provides us with a hero whose own life is rife with undeserved problems, and runs its course atop a strong undercurrent of sadness. Michael Douglas gives one of his better performances as Bill Foster, an unremarkable man who finds his world torn apart and finally just snaps. He has lost his wife and little girl (which is his own fault); he’s lost his job, the one thing that made him feel important; he just wants things to be like they used to be. He doesn’t want to sit in traffic with no air conditioning or pay almost a dollar for a little can of soda or see plastic surgeons living the life of Riley while he can’t even support his little girl. His journey “home” is an extraordinary one, and the kinds of awful people he encounters on the way do nothing to help his mentality. It’s hard not to cheer him on when he manages to effect an escape from a couple of gangsters trying to rob him, but acts such as holding a burger joint up just because they refuse to serve him breakfast after lunch time is, obviously, way out there. No matter what terrible things he does, though, I can’t get completely past the fact that he earnestly wants to see his little girl and give her a present for her birthday; in a clearly psychotic way, I find this movie somewhat touching, and that only makes the whole experience more depressing than it already is.
    Robert Duvall is indeed quite good as the good cop, Prendergast, pursuing this vigilante on his last day before retirement. His life is no dream either, but of course he handles his own problems in a way quite unlike our man Foster does. His wife is clearly disturbed, made frighteningly burdensome and vulnerable by the death of their own little girl and an earlier wounding of her husband on the job. For her benefit, he took a desk job and is forced to put up with a lot of jokes and insults from his fellow cops, including his own boss. Except for his partner, all of the cops in this film are as unfeeling and cruel as some of the shady characters Foster meets up with during his journey home, and that is to me one of the more disturbing aspects of this film.
    One of the things I liked most about Falling Down was its attempt to portray Foster as one very disturbed man and not a stand-in for any type of stereotypical vigilante; one character in particular makes this point quite clearly when, discovering that Foster doesn’t actually agree with him in his own twisted, stereotypically extremist mindset, he asks the man just what kind of vigilante he is supposed to be. My own thinking is that Falling Down is not meant to be a warning about a group of potential Bill Fosters festering in the midst of society; instead, by showing us what happens to one man, it is warning us to walk carefully on our own journeys and to be careful to keep our tempers in check even when the world seems to be out to get us. At the same time, it doesn’t imply that we should roll over and play dead whenever a problem comes our way, using the character of Prendergast to show us that we can and should stand up for ourselves but only in constructive ways. I really have a lot of conflicting emotions about this film, but the one thing I am sure of is that Falling Down is an unforgettable motion picture well worth seeing.

    0

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  2. David Montgomery "Book Critic" says:
    69 of 79 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Mad as Hell and Not Taking It Anymore, May 18, 2000
    By 
    David Montgomery “Book Critic” (davidjmontgomery.com) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Falling Down [VHS] (VHS Tape)
    Some people think this film is about violence or anger or racism. It’s not, though. It’s about sadness. The sadness that comes when life loses its meaning. The kind of sadness that can drive a man to do terrible things.
    Michael Douglas stars as an unemployed defense worker who is having a very bad day. It starts with him being stuck in traffic on an L.A. freeway. No one is moving, his air conditioner is broken, and the exhaust fumes are overpowering. Finally, he abandons his car and sets out on foot. (The opening scene is an homage to the opening of Fellini’s “8 1/2.”)
    The unnamed Douglas character, as he frequently says, is just trying to get home. He doesn’t want any trouble; he just wants to see his family. Events, though, seem to conspire against him.
    Along the way, he runs into a Korean grocer, Hispanic gangbangers, a homeless man, a neo-Nazi skinhead, and other colorful SoCal denizens who drive him to the edge. That’s where the violence begins. This brings him to the attention of Sgt. Prendergrast (Robert Duvall), a police officer who is about to retire. Before he does, though, he is determined to catch Douglas.
    Despite being on opposite sides of the law, the similarities between these two men are greater than the differences. Both of them are failures at home and at work. Both of them lead lives that have never quite lived up to their expectations; lives of “quiet desperation.” The only difference is in how each man copes with his failures.
    Michael Douglas is excellent in this role, playing it in a very controlled and understated way. It would have been very easy to go over the top with it, but he never does. Duvall is good, as usual, in the more reserved, low profile part.
    What is most compelling about this story is how real it seems. The things Douglas does are thing we’ve all thought about doing. The things he feels–the anger, the helplessness–are all things we’ve felt. In that sense, he represents a side of ourselves; a side we don’t want to admit we have, but one that we can’t deny.

    0

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  3. Missing Person says:
    20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    a chillingly powerful film that seems to often be misunderstood, January 20, 2006
    By 
    Missing Person (United States) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Falling Down [VHS] (VHS Tape)
    Joel Schumacher’s 1992 movie “Falling Down” is a chillingly powerful film that seems to get often misinterpreted. Don’t get the wrong idea, there definitely IS substance to this movie–it’s not just some kind of freak show.

    Michael Douglas, in a spellbinding performance, plays William Foster, a man who totally collapses emotionally while stuck in traffic one morning. He ditches his car, leaving it right in the middle of the roadway, and begins an on-foot trek ‘home’ through the streets of Los Angeles. What follows is a day of extremely tempermental and violent behavior from Foster, lashing out against a Korean shop owner who ‘won’t make change’, Latino gang members who accuse him of invading their territory, a fast food restaurant that’s ‘stopped serving breakfast’, and a neo-Nazi gun shop owner who already has some frightening issues of his own.

    With its story of a white man ‘fighting back’ against urban decay, “Falling Down” is similar to the 1970 film “Joe” (starring Peter Boyle). A deeper peek though reveals “Falling Down” to be kind of a cross between “Five Easy Pieces” and “Taxi Driver”, both masterpieces in their own right–William Foster’s wildly erratic and tempermental behavior strongly brings to mind the former’s Robert Dupea (Jack Nicholson), while the good-guy-turned-violent reactionary element of Foster isn’t too far off from the latter’s Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro).

    Michael Douglas is clearly the perfect actor for the role of William Foster. Douglas’ terrific knacks for subtlety and dry humor are key ingredients to making his character, despite all of his fits of violence, frighteningly sympathetic. It never appears that Foster derives any amount of pleasure or satisfaction from his violent reactions–it’s as if he thinks he is merely ‘bringing justice’ to the inadequacies of everyday life.

    We learn that Foster’s ultimate destination is to return to his ex-wife’s home for his daughter’s birthday. We learn from the ex-wife (played by Barbara Hershey) that she has a court order against him from seeing her or the daughter. She admits that he never actually resorted to violence against her on the daughter, but that she “thinks he could”.

    Robert Duvall plays Prendergast, an about-to-retire cop. Despite the fact that it’s originally intended to be Prendergast’s last day on the job, he becomes immersed in the trail being left by Foster. The two finally encounter each other in the movie’s powerful ‘big climax’–by this time, Foster has definitely reached the point of insanity, or as he says in his own words a bit earlier on in the film, “past the point of no return”.

    Michael Douglas makes it seems as though this kind of devastating emotional collapse could easily happen to just about any ‘average Joe’, and that’s where a great deal of the film’s power lies. “Falling Down” is a thought-provoking movie that really stays with you.

    0

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

spidermarkets-20
US
AKIAIUTABXCOUVJABGBA